revolutionary love

This Fall at Sacred Place

Sacred Place Together

Each Sunday, Pastor Matthew will speak on a story from Scripture which shows an aspect of how the Christian Story reveals what Valarie speaks to in each chapter of her book, See No Stranger.

Sundays at 10:30 am on Zoom and 11 am on Facebook Live!

The Book Club

Each Friday, we'll discuss the chapter from Valarie Kaur's book which Pastor Matthew referenced the previous Sunday. You can join every week or simply drop in on weeks you are available.

Series Schedule + Resources

LOVING OTHERS: SEE NO STRANGER

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Once we stop wondering about people, we begin to see them as other instead of as part of ourselves. To begin to bring all of us back together, we must look at others as one of us.

“Wonder is where love begins, but the failure to wonder is the beginning of violence. Once people stop wondering about others, once they no longer see others as part of them, they disable their instinct for empathy. And once they lose empathy, they can do anything to them, or allow anything to be done to them. Entire institutions built to preserve the interests of one group of people over another depend on this failure of imagination.”

— Valarie Kaur, See No Stranger, Chapter 1

LOVING OTHERS: SEE NO STRANGER

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In the story of Lazarus, Jesus grieves even though He knows that healing will come and that this death is not permanent.

“We must be able to say: This was wrong and must not happen again. Telling the story is the prerequisite to justice. But for the story to matter, someone we trust must be listening. It is not easy to listen. … But it is worth it. Grieving together, bearing the unbearable, is an act of transformation: It brings survivors into the healing process, creates new relationships, and energizes the demand for justice. We come to know people when we grieve with them through stories and rituals. It is how we build real solidarity, the kind that shows us the world we want to live in—and our role in fighting for it.” (Kaur, 2020, p. 44)

To live out revolutionary love, we must say and show to others, “You are grieving, but you do not grieve alone.”

LOVING OTHERS: SEE NO STRANGER

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The story of Queen Esther, and her bravery in standing up for the Jewish people, shows the kind of solidarity and fight for justice we see in Valarie’s story.

“The question therefore is not whether or not we will fight in our lives but how we choose to fight.” (Kaur, 2020, p. 67)

To fight is to choose to protect those in harm’s way. To fight with revolutionary love is to fight against injustice alongside those most impacted by harm, in a way that preserves our opponents’ humanity as well as our own

How can revolutionary love inform how we fight against injustice?

Watch this TED Talk on anti-racism.

LOVING OPPONENTS: TEND THE WOUND

Chapter 4

LOVING OPPONENTS: TEND THE WOUND

Chapter 5

LOVING OPPONENTS: TEND THE WOUND

Chapter 6

LOVING OURSELVES: BREATHE AND PUSH

Chapter 7

LOVING OURSELVES: BREATHE AND PUSH

Chapter 8

LOVING OURSELVES: BREATHE AND PUSH

Chapter 9

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